Facebook for Business: I’ve Done It Wrong – Help!

by Tracy on December 13, 2010

in Business, Social Media, Social Networking

So, you’ve read the 10 Reasons to Switch Your Business Profile to a Page, or the Facebook for Business: The Basics post, and you had a sinking feeling as you realised you had accidentally breached Terms of Service (ToS). You’ve been using a personal profile instead of a business page, adding friends, posting primarily business content – and/or maintaining multiple accounts. Now you realise you’re at risk of account deletion, or a ban.

Or maybe you knew you should’ve been using a profile but liked being able to add people as friends – but now you’re starting to realise that whilst your actual friends and family don’t mind having your business/organisation as a ‘friend’, you’re alienating many more potential customers or fans who don’t want you to have access to their profiles (would you accept a ‘friend’ request from Coca-Cola, or Tesco?) and prefer to do their interactions with organisations via pages, with their privacy intact.

Perhaps you didn’t realise that by using a profile you’re missing out on the powerful analytics that Facebook provides with pages (Facebook “insights”), which you don’t get with profiles – or that there’s a limit on ‘friends’ (5,000) but not on ‘likes’.

Whichever it is, you’re now facing the prospect of a clean-up, re-building networks and moving people to your new page(s). Well fear not! With this post, I aim to help you fix up any mess with minimal time and disruption to your networks.

Update: Facebook have introduced an automatic process for converting a profile to a page. This is quicker, but has both pros and cons – read on to see if it will work for you, and if not, I’ve outlined the manual fix for all scenarios below.

Automatic Profile-to-Page Conversion

To permanently switch your profile to a page, go to http://www.facebook.com/pages/create.php?migrate. This will transfer your profile pictures and add all of your friends and subscribers as people who like your page. Note that this is the only information that will be transferred, so you must save any other important information before the switch (see Download Your Information below). You’ll also need to (temporarily) assign new admins for any groups or pages that you manage with this profile, as the account you’re converting will lose these admin rights during the conversion process. The conversion is irreverisible, so be sure you want to do it before you proceed.

Note: To use the automatic profile-to-page conversion, you’ll have to be logged into a computer you’ve logged in from before. You’ll also only be able to choose a page name similar to the existing profile name – so if you also want to change the name you’d be better creating a new page from scratch.

Manual Fix

If the automatic solutions doesn’t suit you, you’ll find a manual fix to suit your circumstances in the list below. It’ll be a little bit futtery, but stick the kettle on, open a beer or pour a glass of wine and let’s get settled down to this one-time clean-up.

Young scallywags having a smoke behind the bike shed (tsk)Now here’s the thing. You can do your clean-up strictly within ToS by deleting/converting illegitimate accounts as quickly as possible, and then building up your networks again – I’m going to call that the School Prefect route. Or you could choose to temporarily (continue to) flout the rules in order to smooth the transition/use re-work-saving shortcuts. I’m going to call that the Smoking Behind The Bike Shed route. (The ultimate SBTBS route is of course continuing with your breach-of-service activities in the hope that you don’t get caught, but I really don’t recommend that.) For some of the following steps, I’m going to give both options. Just be aware that whilst you have more than one account, you’re in breach of ToS; and if you’ve been using a personal profile for primarily business use that’s a breach too and anyone can report you at any time for being a dirty rotten spammer. So be warned, and proceed as you wish. Okay? Let’s get to it…

Which Type of Account Do You Want?

You can have one account, and one only – and only a personal account has an associated profile. Here, again, are your two options:

A personal account - which has a profile, named for you, not your business, and where you may or may not mention your business as part of your normal personal interaction. You won’t be using it excessively to sell to or otherwise spam your ‘friends’. You can use your profile to set up/maintain page(s) – and you may also use it to join groups and become fans of other pages.

A business account – for those very concerned about privacy (and it’s a valid concern of course; particularly for people in security-conscious occupations). If you only want to use Facebook only for business purposes, you can, but only in a very limited way. You can use a business account to maintain one or more pages and social ads for your business. But, as it doesn’t have a profile, you won’t be able to add friends or join groups (such as business interest groups). You will, however be able to ‘like’ other pages. Note: You can upgrade a business account to a personal account at any time (see below).

If you’ve multiple accounts and/or are using a personal account for business, and are discovered (someone told me the other day they always ‘report for spam’ any business that sends them a friend request), you can have your account(s) deleted and may even be banned entirely from using Facebook. Remember: Facebook is a social network with some features for business, not the other way around.

With that in mind, choose what you want your account type to be. With either option, you’re going to be maintaining/creating business pages, which have a whole host of useful marketing tools (such as those Facebook insights) that profiles don’t have!

Pick The Scenario That Describes You

Click on the scenario that describes you from the list below (if I’ve missed any, let me know in the comments):

#1: I have one business account. I want to upgrade it to a personal account
#2: I have one personal account. I’ve been using it for business purposes and now want to keep it for personal use
#3: I have one or more personal account(s). I want to change to a business account
#4: I have a mix of business and personal accounts. I want to keep one business account
#5: I have a mix of business and personal accounts. I want to keep one personal account
#6: I have two or more personal accounts. I want to keep one personal account
#7: I have two or more business accounts. I want to keep one business account
#8: I have two or more business accounts. I want one personal account
#9: I want to delete the lot and start from scratch

#1: I have one business account. I want to upgrade it to a personal account.

At any time, you can upgrade your business account to a personal one, by clicking the ‘Create Your Profile’ button when you log in to your account. You’ll be asked for additional information; your full name, a security question, and an answer to your security question. Once this final registration step is completed, these changes cannot be reverted. You will then permanently have a personal account on the site.
NB: In this specific scenario, you’ll still be able to manage all the pages and socials ads you’ve created. Remember, fans of your pages will not have visibility or access to your personal profile. (See http://www.facebook.com/help/?faq=12830 for more info)

…And you’re done!

#2: I have one personal account. I’ve been using it for business purposes and now want to use pages/groups for business and keep my profile for personal use

If your profile currently shows anything other than your real name, you’re going to have to change that (see below). Regarding what sorts of things to post on your profile, and adding people as friends, read Facebook’s ToS and do your best to stay on the right side of them – i.e. not posting exclusively or excessively about your business. This is, however, a grey area – after all, if you run your own business, or are passionate about the business you’re working for, you’re going to talk about that socially, aren’t you? But don’t talk (almost) exclusively about your business in a social space. (After all, you wouldn’t offline – hopefully.) 

  1. If you also have a business page, make most of your business-related posts there. You’ll still want to think about strategy/tone/frequency and type of posts – but that’s for another discussion
  2. If you don’t already have a business page, set one up and save the URL (note there’s also the option at this point to import contacts from address books/email accounts)
  3. Click the ’share’ link on your new page and choose to post to your own timeline or a friend’s, or to another page, or message people individually. (This is the really time-consuming part, which is why many people opt for the automatic conversion.) You may wish to add a message to say you’re switching your profile to personal use and they can keep up to date with business info via this new page (to prepare them for when you drop them like hot potatoes…)
  4. Review your past status updates/posts on your user profile, perhaps deleting any that look too full-on, and start talking like a human being who happens, among other things, to run/work for a business they love!
  5. Set your status to an explanation that you’re moving business info to a page.
  6. If you have to change your profile name (because you’ve it set as your business name and not your own), complete the following additional steps:
    1. If you’ve any groups set up, note that when you change your name, that will become visible to every member of the group. So if privacy is an issue here, you may want to delete the group– again, letting people know to find your business on your new page instead
    2. Delete anyone on your existing ‘friends’ list who you don’t want to keep when you change to your real name. (If this is everybody, or nearly everybody, and you’re up for something a bit more technical, you could use a script to delete large swathes of ‘friends’ at a time – see this Greasemonkey script as an example)
    3. You may wish to respond to any messages asking why you’ve dropped someone with something along the lines of ‘As per Facebook guidelines this profile is now strictly for personal use, I’ve created a new page for [insert name] where we’d love to keep in touch with you – hope to see you there!’
    4. Change your profile name as per this help page
  7. Continue…

Alternative SBTBS fix:

    If most/all of your friends are business acquaintances, and your profile is wrongly set up with a business name rather than your own name, the quickest route would be as follows:

  1. If you don’t already have a business page, set one up and save the URL (note there’s also the option at this point to import contacts from address books/email accounts)
  2. Click the ’share’ link on your new page and choose to post to your own timeline or a friend’s, or to another page, or message people individually. (This is the really time-consuming part, which is why many people opt for the automatic conversion.) You may wish to add a message to say you’re switching your profile to personal use and they can keep up to date with business info via this new page
  3. Save off any content you want to keep from existing profile/groups/events
  4. If privacy is an issue, close down any groups of which you’re currently sole admin (see Groups)
  5. Create a second personal profile with your correct name – being aware this is a temporary breach of ToS (multiple accounts), so do this at your own risk!
  6. Log back into your old profile, go to your business page and make your new profile an admin of the page
  7. Delete (don’t just deactivate) your old profile – here. (NB: Interacting with Facebook before this request completes (14 days, apparently) can undo your delete request – see this WikiHow article for full instructions
  8. Continue…

#3: I have one or more personal account(s). I want to change to a business account

Maybe you’ve decided you only want a business account and don’t have any desire/use for any of the social aspects of Facebook at all? Update: You can now convert a personal account to a business one, via this link. NOTE:

  1. All your confirmed friends will be converted into ‘likes’ – pending friend requests will be lost. It might be a nice idea to let people know you’re switching to a page format before converting, via a status update
  2. The only other data transferred will be your profile picture, so you may want to Download Your Info first. If you have other pages/ads, you won’t be able to move these over, so you’ll lose those (and any events/groups) and have to create new ones. (See my note on ads, below)
  3. Remember to delete any groups of which you’re currently sole admin (see Groups) before the conversion
  4. There is no turning back with this option, so only make the switch if you’re sure you don’t want to maintain a personal profile. If you’re unsure, consider Fix 2, Fix 5 or Fix 6 instead

 

#4: I have a mix of business and personal accounts. I want to keep one business account

Whichever accounts you get rid of will lose their associated pages – there’s no way to transfer these to a business account (you could transfer to a personal account, by adding that account as an admin, so you might want to consider Fix 5 instead). As to ads – I’m waiting to hear back from Facebook as to whether these can be transferred to another account (see my note, below); in the meantime, if you’ve any insights on that please share below!

  1. If you don’t already have a page associated with the business account you’re keeping (i.e. you created the account via a social ad), you have 2 choices. Either create one and save the URL (note there’s also the option at this point to import contacts from address books/email accounts), or convert one of your personal accounts to a page. Friends of this account will automatically be converted to ‘likes’ – see Fix 3 for full info. Remember to come back here to Fix 4 when finished to complete clean-up!
  2. For any account(s) you’re deleting, log in to each in turn and complete the following steps:
    1. Save off info and photos from any pages/ads/groups/events managed by the accounts you’ll be deleting (see Download Your Info, below)
    2. Delete any groups of which you’re currently sole admin (see Groups)
    3. Go to the business page you’re keeping and click ’share’; choose to post to your own timeline or a friend’s, or to another page, or to message people individually. (This is the really time consuming part, which is why many people opt for the automatic conversion)
    4. Delete (don’t just deactivate) the account, via this page. (NB: Interacting with Facebook before this request completes (14 days, apparently) can undo your delete request – see this WikiHow article for full instructions
  3. Recreate any other pages and ads from your saved info
  4. Continue…

#5: I have a mix of business and personal accounts. I want one personal account

You’ve a choice here of whether to keep an existing personal account (perhaps to keep all the associated friends) or to upgrade an existing business account to a personal one (to keep the pages/ads associated with it).

If keeping a personal account:

  1. Make this personal account the admin for any existing pages, groups and events, if possible (this won’t be possible for pages associated with a business account you’re deleting) – do this by logging in to other profiles in turn, going to the page/group/event in question and adding the profile you’re keeping as an admin
  2. If you don’t already have a business page, set one up and save the URL (note there’s also the option at this point to import contacts from address books/email accounts)
  3. For the account(s) you’re deleting, log in to each in turn and complete the following steps:
    1. Save off any info from pages/events/groups associated with other accounts (see Download Your Info, below)
    2. Save off any info from ads and see my note on ads, below
    3. (For personal accounts only:) Move over any friends you wish to keep by going to the profile you’ll be keeping and clicking the cog icon beside the ‘message’ button, top right. Click ’suggest friends’ from the drop-down menu that appears and select the ones you want to add
    4. (For personal accounts only:) Go to your new page and click the ’share’ link; choose to post to your own timeline or a friend’s, or to another page, or message people individually. (This is the really time-consuming part, which is why many people opt for the automatic conversion.) You may wish to add a message to say you’re switching your profile to personal use and they can keep up to date with business info via this new page
    5. Delete (don’t just deactivate) the account at this page. (NB: Interacting with Facebook before this request completes can undo your delete request – see this WikiHow article for full instructions)
  4. Continue…

If keeping a business account (and upgrading it to a personal account):

  1. If you don’t already have a business page associated with this account, set one up
  2. Save off any info from pages/events/groups associated with other accounts (see Download Your Info, below)
  3. Save off any info from ads and see my note on ads, below
  4. For remaining steps, choose from the following routes:School Prefect Route:
    1. For the account(s) you’re deleting, log in to each in turn and complete the following steps:
      1. Go to your business page and click the ’share’ link; choose to post to your own timeline or a friend’s, or to another page, or message people individually. (This is the really time-consuming part, which is why many people opt for the automatic conversion.) You may wish to add a message to say you’re switching your profile to personal use and they can keep up to date with business info via this new page
      2. Delete any groups of which you’re currently sole admin or take a chance that you’ll be able to re-join/make yourself admin with your new profile (read Groups for more info)
      3. Delete (don’t just deactivate) the account via this page. (NB: Interacting with Facebook before this request completes can undo your delete request – see this WikiHow article for full instructions)
    2. Upgrade your business account by logging in and clicking the ‘Create your Profile’ button as per Fix 1

    Smoking Behind The Bike Shed Route:

    1. Upgrade your business account by logging in and clicking the ‘Create your Profile’ button. Be warned that you’ll have to provide your full name and a security question/answer – I’m only guessing, but if this is a duplicate of info already held by Facebook, it could trigger a ‘multiple account’ flag? You could (temporarily breaching ToS) use a different name until you’ve deleted other accounts and then change your name to the correct one – as always, your call!
    2. For the account(s) you’re deleting, log in to each in turn and complete the following steps:
      1. Go to the business page you’re keeping (or create one) and click the ’share’ link on your new page and choose to post to your own timeline or a friend’s, or to another page, or message people individually. (This is the really time-consuming part, which is why many people opt for the automatic conversion.) You may wish to add a message to say you’re switching your profile to personal use and they can keep up to date with business info via this new page
      2. For any group/event/page adminstrated by the account, make your newly-upgraded profile an administrator
      3. Delete (don’t just deactivate) the account via this page. (NB: Interacting with Facebook before this request completes can undo your delete request – see this WikiHow article for full instructions)
  5. Continue…

#6: I have two or more personal accounts. I want to keep one personal account

As per Fix 5, ‘If Keeping a Personal Account’ (ignore business account info)

#7: I have two or more business accounts. I want to keep one business account

  1. Choose which business account you’re going to keep (which will save any pages/ads associated with it)
  2. For any account(s) you’re deleting, log in to each in turn and complete the following steps:
    1. Save off any info from ads associated with other accounts and see my note on ads, below
    2. Save off any content associated with pages etc, that you’d like to use in future
    3. Delete (don’t just deactivate) the account via this page. (NB: Interacting with Facebook before this request completes can undo your delete request – see this WikiHow article for full instructions)
  3. Recreate pages and ads using saved content
  4. Continue…

#8: I have two or more business accounts. I want one personal account

  1. Choose which business account you’re going to keep and upgrade (which will save any pages/ads associated with it)
  2. For any account(s) you’re deleting, log in to each in turn and complete the following steps:
    1. Save off any info from ads associated with other accounts and see my note on ads, below
    2. Save off any content associated with pages etc, that you’d like to use in future
    3. Delete (don’t just deactivate) the account via this page. (NB: Interacting with Facebook before this request completes can undo your delete request – see this WikiHow article for full instructions)
  3. Recreate pages and ads using saved content
  4. Upgrade the chosen business account by logging in and clicking the ‘Create your Profile’ button as per Fix 1
  5. Continue…

#9: I want to delete the lot and start from scratch

  1. For any account(s) you’re deleting, log in to each in turn and complete the following steps:
    1. Save off any info from ads and see my note on ads, below
    2. Save off any other content you want to keep (friends lists, photos, shared links, posts etc from profile/pages/groups/events)
    3. Delete any groups of which you’re currently the sole admin (see Groups)
    4. Delete (don’t just deactivate) the account, by logging into each in turn and going to this page. (NB: Interacting with Facebook before this request completes can undo your delete request – see this WikiHow article for full instructions)
  2. Create your new account
  3. Re-post old content as required

A Note About Deletions and Messages

I’m waiting to hear back from Facebook about what happens to messages and page invites sent from an account after it gets deleted (not deactivated) – the fixes above mostly include sending messages from an account just before deleting. With a delete apparently taking 14 days to complete, I think the messages would still remain in recipients’ inboxes – but if you know for sure, please let us know in the comments!

Groups

Facebook automatically deletes groups once they’re empty (no members). If you created the group, you can delete the group by removing all members and then yourself. Note that if you were not the first admin and creator of this group, you will not be able to delete the group unless the group creator has left it voluntarily.

If you delete a profile without first deleting any group you maintained from it, the group will remain out there as long as it has one or more members. So make sure and delete any you don’t want to leave out there – remember, if you’re switching to a business account you won’t be able to rejoin any old group you previously maintained with a personal profile.

If you’ve already left the group, you will need to rejoin it and request admin status from the current admin. If the group has no current admin, and is a closed group, you or any other member will be able to take the admin position by clicking “Become Admin” on the right side of the group’s page. (NB: this option does not exist in open groups.) When the last admin leaves a group, there may be a delay before you see the option to become the new admin. You will need to check back periodically until the option appears.

A Note About Ads

For anyone already running Facebook ads: I don’t use ads, and since I can’t create a dummy business account to test my hypotheses without breaching ToS and risking a ban myself, I’m reliant on Facebook replying to some questions that have sprung to mind – and on you! If you have information/experience of some of these issues, please do comment below and I’ll add it into this post (with credit, of course). My current understanding (awaiting confirmation by Facebook) is that ads can’t be transferred from one account to another (if you upgrade from a business to a personal account, they do go with you). So I’d imagine you’d want to stop any ad campaigns you have running before deleting the account that’s managing them, and double-check what the billing implications are. If you’re running an ad, you’ll be familiar with the ad manager and know how to do this/get help from Facebook ad staff.

Contacting Facebook

If you need to contact Facebook directly, a couple of email addresses you can try are:

privacy@facebook.com
info@facebook.com

Download Info

You can now download all the information you’ve ever shared on Facebook – this video shows you how:

And You’re Done! Sort Of…

So that should be you – for now! If you think I’ve missed anything – please comment below and I’ll review for inclusion (with credit, of course). Facebook is constantly changing so do keep checking back to your favourite social media blogs – and don’t forget the Facebook Help center. I keep hearing people say they don’t understand Facebook, but when I ask have they used the help pages, reply ‘oh I never thought to look for help pages…’ Remember: Knowledge is Confidence!

Aside from the technical how-to’s, there are many ongoing discussions about appropriate and effective use of Facebook and other social media for business purposes. Get involved: If you’re using it, you’re part of the debate. We’re all learning as we go!

Special note: Perhaps you as the business owner aren’t going to be the one maintaining your social media presence? Or perhaps you as an employee have been tasked with doing so? There are privacy and even legal issues to be discussed if so; social media for business use is a relatively new field and solutions will need to be worked out company by company (and even department by department). For now, you may just want to use this info as a starting point for working out policy and strategy and investigating legal implications within your company. Here’s a free eBook on legal and ethical issues in social media.

{ 9 comments… read them below or add one }

Laney DeJesus December 13, 2010 at 1:45 pm

OK this information above is really great however confusing to me! If Facebook does not want you to have a business per say on Facebook, why do they offer paid advertising and marketing strategies for my business page on Facebook? It’s linked to my personal account and they bill me when I create advertising for the business page. So they already know I have a personal page and business one.

What am I missing here in relation to what you just wrote above? I see businesses like Zappos and such all over the place on Facebook. Most major retailers have a Facebook page. If Facebook is a social network then why do businesses use it? That means I could report Zappos or any other business page I “liked” as “dirty rotten spammers” and have them shut down right? So if a business did me wrong do the same thing? It would be like a colossal witch hunt! Facebook needs these businesses and their advertising so they can keep from charging the millions and millions who use their site socially.

Are we dealing with a scenario like this below? The quickest way to make a point here about all of this. Because if so, I give Facebook the “The Captain Louis Renault Award”!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T1DEG6BWgp0

Reply

Tracy December 13, 2010 at 3:18 pm

Hi there and thanks for commenting – and the clip! :)

Facebook are quite happy for you to have a business on Facebook – just not to use a personal profile for it:

“A personal account – which has a profile, named for you, not your business, and where you may or may not mention your business as part of your normal personal interaction. You won’t be using it excessively to sell to or otherwise spam your ‘friends’. You can use your profile to set up/maintain a business page (or pages; you may want to segment, for example) – and you may also use it to join groups and become fans of other pages.”

Page are absolutely fine; but a lot of people are setting up profiles thinking they’re pages, naming them with their business name (not allowed) and/or maintaining more than one account (also not allowed). You’re allowed as many pages as you want – and what you’re describing is perfectly legit! What people can and do report businesses for is them setting up profiles and adding strangers as ‘friends’ – that’s pushy/spammy, whereas anyone is free to ‘like’ your page if they do indeed like it (an opt-in choice).

I hope this clears it up – it sounds like you don’t need to be worrying about any of these fixes! What’s your page by the way?

Reply

Laney DeJesus December 13, 2010 at 3:48 pm

Hi Tracy ~

Thanks for your response above! Appreciate it! I don’t have a website simply a Facebook page to do my business linked off my profile page and I tweet it also.

http://www.facebook.com/CHOCOLATEMOOSEFUDGE

We just launched it earlier this year and like the idea of keeping it intimate & engaging with others. We don’t spam and look to friends/fans/customers to pass along the word however, only if they are happy with the product. So it’s word of mouth.

We also set up pages for a family member’s business and for a group, all managed pages off my Facebook Profile.

I definitely “dream it, do it, and love it” on Facebook. Thanks again for the informative blog Tracy! Happy Holidays to you!

Laney

Reply

Tracy December 13, 2010 at 3:59 pm

Laney, you had me at ‘Chocolate Moose Fudge’! You know, I’ve a namesake who makes delectable sweet things too – check out her ‘Tracy Dempsey Originals‘ page on Facebook too! Methinks you’ll be mutual fans. :)

Happy holidays to you too – and continued success to the business(es)!

Tracy

Reply

Baby Store December 13, 2010 at 10:05 pm

This is a wonderful article. Has given me a lot of ideas for my website and future promotions.

Reply

Tracy December 14, 2010 at 9:34 am

Hi there,

Great to hear it, and thanks for commenting! If you haven’t already seen it, I had an earlier post with examples of what many different types of companies and organisations are doing with social media – take a wee look at:

http://soulambition.co.uk/blog/2010/06/social-media-why-bother/

Also, regarding promotions – here’s that link again for Facebook’s guidelines on what you can and can’t do:

http://www.facebook.com/promotions_guidelines.php

Best of luck with it all, and thanks again!
Tracy

Reply

Andrea McConnon Donnelly December 14, 2010 at 11:07 am

Tracy,
Excellent, informative, by-the-book, article that I’m sure many will find very useful and perhaps a little scary if they haven’t been playing by the rules.

I really like the Acme Mortgages example (perhaps from an earlier post) and think it clarifies the difference between Personal Profile and Business Page. For me, if I accept a friend request from say, Bill Banks, owner of Acme Mortgages it would be because I know and want to interact with Bill the person, but there is an expectation that I may receive some content about Mortgages, whereas if I ‘Like’ a page called Acme Mortgages it is purely because I have an interest in Mortgages and will expect Mortgage related content.

The whole spamming issue intrigues me, and cannot believe people would actually report someone for this, unless a blatant breach of ToS. Surely if you accept a friend request from someone you are opting in to receive content/messages from them and if you do not like what they are posting, you can hide or delete said ‘friend’? The rule of thumb for content on a personal page could be a bit like diluting squash 1 part squash to 5 parts water, where your business is the squash and you are the water.

One other point on Pages though, do you think the functionality will ever improve, for example you don’t receive notifications from pages; it only allows for one way communication, unless a fan comments on your post; a page cannot comment on a fans post; or become a member of a group…. I’m sure the list goes on, and there are mant missed opportunities to promote your brand. (must have a look at your post on promoting pages)

What about using company logo for personal profile pic or company name as an alias in order to reinforce the link between profile and page, do Facebook have any issue with that?

Thats all for now, keep up the great work, your slogan Dream It, Do it, Love it – could be changed to Eat it, Drink it, Sleep it given the extent of your knowledge and extremely well put together blog – I’ve spent half my morning hopping back and forth to various links within this blog and find it all extremely useful – thanks!

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Tracy December 14, 2010 at 2:36 pm

Well now, that’s a lovely comment to log in to – thanks Andrea! Delighted to hear it; was a long time in compiling, and it’s a challenge to get all the information out but try and do it in a way that still feels manageable to the reader! As to pages – funnily enough, I’ve just logged in to do a mini-post of a few snippets from the help centre; one is that Facebook say they will maybe add functionality for pages to be able to message individuals directly, but have no date for that. I think the key is that Facebook for now are still maintaining the stance that they are a social network, not a business one, and they don’t want people to get turned off by businesses pushing products/services at them. Even that ability to tweak the ads that show up on your home page (mark them as irrelevant, repetitive or whatever) would point towards user (as in non-commercial) experience trumping business experience. Kind of like they’re hosting a party and people are allowed to set up stalls in the corner but not go up and try and sell to people indirectly.

As to using company logos as a profile pic; I’d imagine that’s a really grey area – I’d personally not risk it, tho’ might have it up in an album of business-related pics maybe – but I think it’s contextual. If someone had a personal profile with the business logo/name as a profile pic, and all their ‘info’ was about the business, and all their wall posts/albums were about the business, then I’d say that’s really pushing it. I like your diluting orange metaphor, by the way!

On the spamming/reporting front – I was quite surprised myself when this local business owner said he’d always report people, but I understand where he’s coming from. It is a social network, and it is an opt-in system (liking pages, as opposed to getting pestered with friend requests from a non-person). You don’t have to accept the friend request first to report someone – you can do it from the invite. What I’d been doing was messaging the business and explaining the breach and giving a bit of info – now I’m linking them to this blog post so they can fix it. I’m sure some of them don’t want the advice, but sure, that’s not my business! :)

Sorry I can’t give more definitive answers to all of this – I’d say stick with your diluting orange analogy, tweak your proportions based on feedback, and keep an eye on the ever-changing guidelines.

Thanks again for the post, have a lovely Christmas!

Tracy

PS I thought you were peeking in my windows when you said Eat It, Drink It, Sleep It – been blogging from bed all week with tonsillitis – many take-away businesses are enjoying brisk trade from here! :)

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Pandora Poikilos January 25, 2011 at 9:31 am

Hi!
Thank you very much for taking the time to write about an issue that requires so much attention when so little thought is given to it. I recently initiated the Pledge of Responsible Social Media Users and to date 70 people have taken this pledge. I look forward to receiving more thoughts and of course more people signing up to take the pledge. While I know we cannot completely remove irresponsibility from the Internet, we can together be a voice towards keeping the cyber world safe.
Cheers – Dora
http://peacefrompieces.blogspot.com/2010/12/pledge-of-responsible-social-media.html

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